Books I've read so far

All the books I've read so far with extensive notes
books-read self-help
The Amity Affliction - Pittsburg
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The Lean Startup

by Eric Ries

About the book:  Most new businesses fail. But most of those failures are preventable. The Lean Startup is a new approach to business that's being adopted around the world. It is changing the way companies are built and new products are launched. The Lean Startup is about learning what your customers really want. It's about testing your vision continuously, adapting and adjusting before it's too late. Now is the time to think Lean.

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The Amity Affliction - Pittsburg
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The 4-Hour Work Week

by Timothy Ferriss

About the book:  Tim Ferriss has trouble defining what he does for a living. Depending on when you ask this controversial Princeton University guest lecturer, he might answer: 'I race motorcycles in Europe' 'I ski in the Andes' 'I scuba dive in Panama' 'I dance tango in Buenos Aires' He has spent more than five years learning the secrets of the 'New Rich', a fast-growing subculture that has abandoned the 'deferred-life plan' and instead mastered the new currencies - time and mobility - to create a new way of living. Why wait a lifetime for your retirement when you can enjoy luxury now? Whether your dream is escaping the rat race, experiencing first class world travel, earning a monthly five-figure income with no management, or just living more and working less, this book is the blueprint. Join Tim Ferriss as he teaches you: - How to outsource your life to overseas virtual assistants for $5 per hour and do whatever you want - How blue chip escape artists travel the world without quitting their jobs - How to eliminate 50% of your work in 48 hours using the principles of a forgotten Italian economist - How exchange your career for life for short work bursts and frequent 'mini-retirements' - How to train your boss to value performance over presence, or kill your job (or company) if it's beyond repair - How to cultivate selective ignorance - and create time - with a low-information diet - How to get free housing worldwide and airfare at 50-80% off - How to fill the void and create a meaningful life after removing work and the office Learn about this and more to live the life you want - now.


Notes:  Notes on Parkinson's law from the book:
* Parkinson's law says the amount of time which one has to perform a task is the amount of time it will take to complete the task.
* The best solution is to use both together, i.e. Identify the few critical tasks that contribute most to income and schedule them with very short and clear deadlines.
* Ask/do these questions often to everything from your friends, advertising, sports, family, dreams:
1. Which 20% of sources are causing 80% of my problems and unhappiness?
2. Which 20% of sources are resulting in 80% of my desired outcomes and happiness?
3. Throw it all up on the wall, the data, and see what sticks and works best for you
4. Are you inventing things to do to avoid the important?
5. Define a to-do list
6. Define a not-to-do list
7. What are the top-3 activities I use to fill time to feel I've been productive
8. Don't arrive at office or at computer without a clear list of priorities
9. Compile to-do list every evening for the next day
10. Add not more than 3 mission-critical items in to-do list per day
11. Use short deadlines to force immediate action
12. Do not multi-task
13. Check email daily once every 2 days
14. Use batching in emails or for your time consuming works
15. Learning to ignore things which are not useful
16. Focus on "Just-in-time" information instead of "just-in-case" information
17. Limit email consumption (Check only twice a day. Refer pg. 97 of 4HWW)
18. Don't check email first thing in the morning
19. Use simple email responder notifying your email checking schedule (Refer pg. 98 of 4HWW)
20. Use email template from template@fourhourworkweek.com
21. Avoid meetings without any clear agenda or ask for agenda of the meeting via email when asked for a meeting (pg. 103)
22. Always define an end time for yourself in the meeting
23. Never automate something that can be eliminated. And never delegate something that can be automated or streamlined
24. Each delegated task must be both time-consuming and well-defined
25. Use the flow chart to define your to-do work from pg.144
26. Use email as email service, not as a chat one
27. Prioritize sleep over email; workout on a regular schedule; have group dinners with friends at least 2x/week.

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The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains

by Nicholas Carr

About the book:  Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a Silent Spring for the literary mind.”—Michael Agger, Slate “Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways. Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.

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The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari: A Fable About Fulfilling Your Dreams & Reaching Your Destiny

by Robin Sharma

About the book:  Wisdom to Create a Life of Passion, Purpose, and Peace This inspiring tale provides a step-by-step approach to living with greater courage, balance, abundance, and joy. A wonderfully crafted fable, The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari tells the extraordinary story of Julian Mantle, a lawyer forced to confront the spiritual crisis of his out-of-balance life. On a life-changing odyssey to an ancient culture, he discovers powerful, wise, and practical lessons that teach us to: Develop joyful thoughts Follow our life's mission and calling Cultivate self-discipline and act courageously Value time as our most important commodity Nourish our relationships, and – live fully, one day at a time A FABLE ABOUT FULFILLING YOUR DREAMS AND REACHING YOUR DESTINY

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The Alchemist

by Paulo Coelho

About the book:  Paulo Coelho's enchanting novel has inspired a devoted following around the world. This story, dazzling in its simplicity and wisdom, is about an Andalusian shepherd boy named Santiago who travels from his homeland in Spain to the Egyptian desert in search of treasure buried in the Pyramids. Along the way he meets a Gypsy woman, a man who calls himself king, and an Alchemist, all of whom point Santiago in the direction of his quest. No one knows what the treasure is, or if Santiago will be able to surmount the obstacles along the way But what starts out as a journey to find worldly goods turns into a meditation on the treasures found within. Lush, evocative, and deeply humane, the story of Santiago is art eternal testament to the transforming power of our dreams and the importance of listening to our hearts.

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